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General Third Way Café |
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I should have said, if you love him I would not worry about the differences - just enjoy worshipping God together and being together. Don't let theology get in your way, (nor his parents).

not:"But hey, if you love him,who cares?"



Rikki

7/26/2011 5:31:00 AM
General Third Way Café | gender identification - to be or not to be
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Hi Ann,
The other thing I should have pointed out for me it is’ born and bred’ women, as in my case, who guide me in my transitioning.
There are some people who obtain their hormones illegally and have never done the medical, psychological, and psychiatric pathway/ process as I am doing. I regard these people as blight on our Trans community as they are not representative of us. Without an official diagnosis from an appropriately trained professional how can they claim to be gender dysphoric/ transsexual?



Rikki

7/22/2011 3:20:00 PM
General Third Way Café | gender identification
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Ann,
I meant to mention that you seem to have a tendency to read into things not said/ mentioned. Why is that I wonder?
I often find that prejudice seems to include this aspect.

Riiki

7/22/2011 3:14:00 PM
General Third Way Café | misconceptions and: gender identification
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Hi Ann,
Thanks for your input.
In reply I would like to start with this quote which is published by a Gender Clinic, written by psychiatrists/ psychologists and so forth.
“Firstly, sex and gender are two completely separate traits. Sex us determined by physical genitalia whereas gender is the psychological perception of being male or female.
Secondly, no male and no female are exclusively masculine or feminine. We all of us have elements of both genders present in our psychological and biological makeup”, (Practical Transitioning Guidelines – Transgender Victoria)
We in the transgender/ transsexual community have no desire to stand out in a crowd. We simply do those things which you will find ‘born and bred’ women doing.
Ann, I have, due to my nursing employment, and Army nursing service, have lived with a great many and varied females. Probably more than you ever will or have. I am very much aware of the diversity of how women express their identity. I am simply part of that diversity. If you are scared of how I express my identity it is probably due to ignorance. Setting yourself up as a bench mark for femininity is quite outrageous and insulting to other women.
Hence forth also, your insistence that the XX chromosome is the definition of femineity is also fallacious. Actually it goes against the definition of gender as far as the legal profession is concerned. It is this pompous attitude of yours that causes great damage to the equality between people.
Unlike drag queens, who tend to caricaturise females, the goal of transgender/ transsexuals is to blend into society and go about largely unnoticed, not drawing undue attention to themselves. (my experience when I first went public was quite the anti-climax – nobody noticed, which was my aim).
In our social occasions as a Tran’s community, we wear jeans, T shirts, and sneakers. If fact we are rather concerned when new people turn up wearing a lot of excess makeup, loud dresses and such. We wonder if they have a deformed idea of who we are and who women are. We are so not into the drag queen scene.
However, like a lot of women who have important occasions to dress appropriately, I do not apologise for wearing what most women would consider normal for such an occasion. I do take pride in how I present myself with my grooming, (always have). For example, when a women turns up for a professional job interview are you saying it would be appropriate to turn up wearing daggy jeans, T shirt, and a dirty face with their hair a mess? Look around you and see what women are wearing to interviews, dinners, shows, and so on.
As I have said before, the greatest critics of women are other women, you have proven my point!
You are not so progressive as you think you are.


Rikki

7/22/2011 3:01:00 PM
General Third Way Café | God loves all people.
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Hi Ann,

Documentaries? grind you into the dirt? Never ocurred to me actually.Not my intention at least.
You seem to have a lot of anger issues.
All the best anyway.
The information and suggestions were given for interest only.

Rikki

7/15/2011 12:48:00 AM
General Third Way Café | How to frustrate an earnest Chrisitian
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Hi Ann,
I don't recall saying there was anything wrong with you.
Actually, as posted previously, I stated that I did not wish dissuade you from your beliefs. In this case I simply do not know why anyone, not just you, would ask a question that did not reflect anything that had been discussed. To me it seemed rather odd, perhaps even an effort to belittle. Unfortunately, postings carry no emotional tone.
However, if I had said something like, " God has said or revealed something to me",(like some of the tele evangelists seem to do), I would then understand why someone would ask if I had had a special revelation or something.



Eric

3/6/2011 3:16:00 AM
General Third Way Café | How to frustrate an earnest Chrisitian
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Hey Ann,

I don’t recall ever saying I had a ‘special revelation from God’, so there was no need for the question.
If I had a claim that I have had a special revelation from God, I think I would have mentioned it.
Like you, I mean exactly what I post.


Eric

3/4/2011 12:07:00 AM
General Third Way Café | How to frustrate an earnest Chrisitian
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Ann,
I am not trying to convince you that I am right, nor am I trying to dissuade you from what you hold to be true.
You have your resources that you feel is sufficient for you – that’s your choice, I have mine.
If you feel that your resources are valid and that mine are wrong then so be it.

I use text book resources that I have; I don’t claim to have had some 'special revelation' from God, as you seem to claim. Everything I say, as far as the early church is concerned, comes out of books, I am not making this stuff up.
However, I give you this sample from what I read:
‘”What the apostles handed down was sometimes known as the ‘rule’ of faith or the ‘canon’, (a Greek word meaning ‘measuring stick’), Beliefs could be held up to this measuring stick and compared. On this view, Gnosticism in its various forms failed the test, because it did not match the doctrines which had been handed down in the Church of Rome and other apostolic foundations such as Jerusalem (James the Just), Ephesus (John) and Antioch (Paul).
This meant that there was a standard against which beliefs could be tested. As Tertullian put it in his Prescription against the Heretics: It is clear that all doctrines which agrees with the apostolic churches – those moulds and considered true, as undoubtedly containing what those churches received from the Apostles, the apostles from Christs, Christ from God. And all doctrine must be considered false which contradicts the truth of the churches and apostles of Christ and God…….”
The era from the second to the fifth century or sixth century is often known as that of ‘the church Fathers’
It was during this period that Christianity took a form that we might recognize today, with established doctrines, liturgy, and Church hierarchies.’ ‘From the Lion Handbook –‘ The History of Christianity’, 2007, (ed) Jonathan Hill, pages 44 – 68.
You will no doubt see, as you read the New Testament that not all of the Apostle’s writings can be found there.
(To get a better idea of what was discussed and debated in the early church I suggest you read, ‘A Dictionary of Early Christian Beliefs (ed) David Bercot, Hendrickson Publishers, 2006 edition. You will need a Bible with the Apocrypha. Also from Hendrickson publishers you will find the volume of writings from the ante – Nicene age called the ‘Ante – Nicene Fathers’ interesting to read. In these volumes you will find the debates and controversies of the early church BEFORE the canon of scripture was voted into existence.
In the Bible Dictionary from Harper Collins, edited by Paul J Achtemeirer, with the Society of Bible Literature, 1996 edition, (by the way this Bible Dictionary appears to be recommended by the Mennonite seminary, (and also used by Catholic seminary students), – goggle their seminary book store list to check this). This Bible Dictionary says this of the New Testament: “We do not possess any autographs (originals) of NT writings. We only have copies of copies”. (Page 751). And also this, “From our vantage point, they are only the cream selected from a much larger body of Christian literature of antiquity that included what we know as the Apostolic Fathers, the Apocryphal NT, and the Apologists. The selection process was gradual……”, (page 753).

As for the Holy Spirit working in the lives of Christians, well, what can I say except that the scriptures makes the point that the “Holy Spirit will remind you of all things….”
Also, in the same Bible dictionary it points out that not all sections of the global Church agree which books should make up our New Testament. I also like to remind people of what is in scripture itself,(paraphrased), "if everything done by Jesus (Christ) was to be written down, then I guess not all the books in the world could contain them".
Trying to come up with a theology by just using a Canon of Scripture which we hold to is, to be quite blunt, non – sensible if we ignore those writings of the early church which supports or from which the New Testament was taken from.
To rely solely on what we see in our preferred Bible version (Catholic, protestant, Syriac, etc., ), is like saying all we need to know about an engine is there under the hood, and ignoring the manufacturer’s manual which helps us understand how it is all put together or for the manufacturer to ignore the engineers instructions.

But like I said, I am not trying to convert you, but you may find the extra reading interesting.
I could go on with what is contained in my library of books, but I have College work to do, but in the end - Each to their own.


Eric
Logan, Qld Australia
2/10/2011 4:08:00 AM
General Third Way Café | How to frustrate an earnest Chrisitian
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Eric,

You have informed us, now and then, about the extra and what I name so-called scriptural writings. You tell us that these writings are valid in God's eyes.

Is it that the Spirit of the Lord informed you that the extra scriptural writings are valid in God's eyes? Why do you consider them valid teachings from God? I am truly curious.

Personally, I am not going to learn Greek, Latin, Hebrew, Aramaic and other languages to figure out if the extra biblical writings are from God. The search through history is a life-time study. I did enough research for myself, to decide the Bible we have is enough and from God.

Why should I trust these other sources?

Why should I trust you, Eric, about these extra biblical sources I have been warned against? I am truly asking.

Thank you,

Ann


Sacramento, CA USA
2/9/2011 7:03:00 PM
General Third Way Café | How to frustrate an earnest Chrisitian
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As far as tradition goes I disagree, given the resources that I have at hand and what I have been taught. However I support your right to your point of view.
Though I know where you are coming from in regards to dating the scriptures. One of my Bible dictionaries says eactly what you say, another one of my Bible dictionaries gives another time frame. It comes down to a choice of who you want to believe, which is everyone's right.It is a pity that Pastors and Priests don't always give that amount of choice. When you consider how many theologians with Phds teach different things it is no wonder people disagree. I think the message is the same in any case, "love your neighbour as yourself".

Eric

2/9/2011 3:49:00 AM
General Third Way Café | Australia's military history: How to frustrate an earnest Chrisitian
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On the blog that I have mentioned, where I seem to have been blocked, I attempted to respond to a critic, who goes by the name of Doug, who wrote, “Historically the military have had a small place in Australian history…..”.
The facts can be found at Wikipedia in the article, ‘Military History of Australia’. Goggling other websites on the subject will give you similar results
For the Australians who monitor the blog in question and this site I hope this article helps you to know the truth of the matter.



Eric
Logan, Australia
2/3/2011 3:17:00 AM
General Third Way Café | Bible translations
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Hi Ann,

You are right, my 1977 edition of the RSV does leave out the words you mentioned.

Eric
Queensland Australia
1/15/2011 10:11:00 PM
General Third Way Café | Out With the Old?
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Hi Ann,
I agree, colloqualisms are important. It would be interesting to see how one understands American translations of the Bible in 2000 years in such countries such as Africa, or who knows, the middle east. A Christian, in any era, has in most countries, read their culture and accepted norms into the Bible stories, for example when slavery became accepted practise in western Europe and the U.S.A. People found theological reasons to tolerate slavery. Some Christians today believe it is OK to be filthy rich as Jesus'family were builders and must have had a private business so they must have been a family of means, (a modern interpretation of the Bible passage which indicates Joseph's and Jesus industry/ business - while forgetting the bartering/ community mutual support system that existed).

And yes, translators do have an agenda when they translate. One can see this in the sub headings before the chapters of the book of Genesis of the NRSV and in the words they choose. The same can be said for most Bible translation teams, (did you know that the evangelicals wanted an evangelical version of the RSV?). Also, note that I did say that one must understand the cultures, (values, norms, stories, etc), in order to understand the settings/ backgrounds of the naratives/ stories found in the Bible. This can also be a problem as I have found different understandings of the same passage in the various Bible dictionaries that I have. I guess, historically, different countries or regions have different (cultural) understandings of the stories of the Bible depending on who did the missionary work in their area. I don't see this process changing much over the next 2000 years. So translations are important.

Eric
Logan, Qld Australia
1/13/2011 12:44:00 AM
General Third Way Café | Mixers: Out With the Old?
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I love the comments from your wife! Thanks for sharing. I won't get rid of the old mixer just yet. I'm having trouble with it mashing a small quantity of potatoes. Thanks for posting!


Harrisonburg, va usa
1/11/2011 11:55:00 AM
General Third Way Café | Out With the Old?
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I think the best translation to have is the one that you will read. Better still, it is an interesting exercise to compare and contrast different versions ( as well as looking at non english Bibles). I once owned a Bible in Esperanto and I was able combine my interst in the language with my love of reading the bible.

These days I use a Bible word dictionary that includes an English, Hebrew/ Aramaic and Creek dictionary. Much better than owning a heap of Bibles translation. Though I still have a soft spot for the King James version.

As for immigrants, well, I have always nourished a desire to return to the U.S, (or Canada), and gain citizenship, but you know, when you are down, and you are unwell, or just plain lonely, nothing beats an extended family who has known you all your life and who cares for you.

I had a lot of patients who could not speak english, and had no extended family or even close family to speak to, or help them. If not for chaplains and their interpreters they would have had no one. They were very lonely and anxious patients.

I do believe that the best people to rebuild a country are the ones who have come from there. Then, in return for their services they should be the first ones to be granted citizenship in the country that took them in and trained them.
We need to populate our countries with nation builders.

Eric
Logan, Qld Australia
1/9/2011 4:32:00 AM
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